Here’s a short list of books that I found inspiring or useful professionally and have recommended as “essential reading” to the sausage students I have mentored:

SAUSAGE MAKING, CHARCUTERIE, MEAT CURING
CHARCUTIER. SALUMIERE. WURSTMEISTER, and THE ART AND PHILOSOPHY OF PRODUCING QUALITY PORK PRODUCTS
by François Vecchio

The definitive American book on sausage making, salumi, and charcuterie, written from François's perspective of 60 years' experience in our craft, well-illustrated and clearly explained. François is our direct connection to the European tradition in sausage making and charcuterie. He has also created as a companion piece to the book, an instructional DVD on utilization of the hog. Combined and individually, these are essential reference materials for every sausage kitchen and charcutier's library. Both are available through his websiteor through Amazon.

CHARCUTERIE
THE PROFESSIONAL CHARCUTERIE SERIESvol. 1 & 2, by Marcel Cottenceau, Jean-François Deport, and Jean-Pierre Odeau

An indispensable two-volume set by three of the premier charcutiers and instructors in France. Intended for the professional, the series covers every aspect of the métier, with the exception of dry-curing. Volume 1 covers hams, sausages and sausage meats, blood sausages and white sausages, rillettes, rillons, confits and smoked pork. Volume 2 includes pates, terrines and ballotines made with poultry, veal, pork, and liver, as well as andouilles, andouillettes, and foie gras. Detailed and beautifully illustrated.

HOME SAUSAGE MAKING
THE ART OF CHARCUTERIEby Jane Grigson (1966)

A beautiful, hand-illustrated book of the highest quality, by a great English cookery writer. It begins with a guide to the charcutier's kitchen and equipment, and covers basics and elaborations of French and English sausages, pâtés, terrines, ballotines, rillettes, sauces, hams, roasting of pork, puddings, innards, and concludes with a discussion of the fat of the pig. Many detailed recipes are provided. Old school in the best way, this superb book was "snout-to-tail" long before the term existed.